Category Archives: Fleets

Ford enters new hybrid electric vehicle market with F-150

Americans are buying SUVs and pick-up trucks like they’re going out of business. So Ford’s announcement yesterday about their plan for 7 electrified vehicles to be introduced in the next 5 years marks the entry of a major automaker into the market segment most in need of higher mileage, less emissions and more torque. In fact, life in the EV space just got very interesting.  Of course, it makes one wonder what took so long?  But congratulations to an American car company who actually recognizes what Americans want and needs by offering a hybrid electric F-150. Of course it would be great if it had a plug but you have to start somewhere.

 

Ford will build seven of 13 new global electrified vehicles coming in the next five years, including F-150 Hybrid pick-up truck, Mustang Hybrid sports car and Transit Custom plug-in hybrid van.

Here’s the data on American consumers, who are rapidly shifting away from sedans and piling into SUVs and pickup trucks:

 

 

 

Energy and Transportation- Oregon Provides Fuel for Thought

Recently I had the opportunity to participate in Oregon’s Ten Year Future Energy Task Force as part of its Transport Design team. Oregon’s  Governor Kitzhaber is endeavoring to make a coherent vision going forward that promotes decreased petroleum consumption and increased economic activity.  This was my first serious task force and I found the exercise both stimulating and daunting.

As a state, Oregon has in place carbon emission reduction policies that require us to reduce our GHG emissions to below 1990 levels by the year 2050.  One way to visualize how we get there is to pick this number and then, using the tools we have, work backwards to see what will get us there.  Which of these tools must we use to reach the goal we have set?   The short answer is that there are a number of tools  we can use  to reach this goal… and we must use all of them .

Enter transportation electrification.  Oregon spends more than $2b per year for transportation fuels. Transportation relies on fossil fuel for 99% of its energy.  As a sector, efficiency and alternative fuel choices have dramatic effects on GHG.  In addition, all the fuel use we displace through these efforts gets translated into money spent domestically and locally.  We have nothing to lose and everything to gain by aligning energy policy behind electric vehicles.

What is the future for Oregon in this? We have four recommendations pending:

  1. Build Oregon into a Center of Excellence for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS).  We have all the pieces to improve vehicle and freight movement through advanced technology, from the universities and research centers to information technology companies.  Encourage businesses to test new ITS products in Oregon.
  2. Accelerate vehicle and fleet turnover by building the needed alternative fuel vehicle infrastructure with charging stations at home, at work, in public areas and for commercial fleets.  Follow that up with making energy efficient vehicles more visible and more attractive to purchase at the point-of-sale.  This includes the right mix of financial and non-cash incentives to get the older, more polluting vehicles off the road and into the junkyard.
  3. Resolve financing and funding barriers that inhibit the market growth of highly efficient vehicles.  As federal CAFÉ standard increase, zero emission vehicles hit the road and fuel use decreases, there will be challenges to a transportation system funded by gas taxes.  Flexible revenue and financing models will help the state achieve its energy and emission goals.  Current plans such as Complete Streets also need to be funded.
  4. Develop complete communities and re-affirm the benefits of Oregon’s land use system.  Oregon’s transportation and land use strategies have evolved over the last 40 years into a model for strategic planning, community-centered decision­-making and efficient outcomes.  The next 10-to-20 years will require renewed efforts to keep a focus on community development within urban growth boundaries.
These are recommendations, at present, and we await the final draft which then goes out to public comment.  I introduce them to you to get YOU thinking about what matters  during the next ten years- because you will be asked to contribute those thoughts during the spring.  This is, after all,  a process, and not intended only for a select few to issue dictum as part of a “secret cabal”.
So, as you commute from home to work or school and back, as you consider what changes in transportation would make the most difference in your life, make your opinion known.
This is an opportunity to touch the future of transportation, here in Oregon, which is what sustainability-conscious people must do (and I say “must” because our children will have no choice but to live in the world we leave them; wouldn’t it be nice if they had some faith that we considered them in our decisions?)

 

EV Roadmap 4- Getting to a Million

Sponsored by Portland State University and PGE, the EV Roadmap series recently completed its fourth iteration. George Beard, Strategic Business Alliance Builder Extraordinaire, constructed the conference around the theme of “Getting to a Million” and interwove the pragmatic with the aspirational.
I have been attending them since the beginning (Nov/09) and always find something intriguing and hopeful in the two days. This time was no exception.

Of particular interest was the conference’s use of electronic polling of the audience the results of which were displayed on the big screen.  Questions ranged from factual knowledge (how much oil does the US import each year?) to subjective conclusions (how likely is Oregon to meet its EV objectives?)

Most provocative was Sam Ori’s presentation of Oil Shockwave, designed to to incite awareness of how precarious the perch is of the United States when it comes to global oil production interruption.  Oil Shockwave is designed to bring seasoned domestic security decisionmakers to confront a terrorist attack  at Saudi Arabia’s Abaquiq oil refinery compounded by geopolitical intrigue.  As a country, we are only 3% (of global oil production)  away from massive price spikes and severe economic damage.   Sam also related that the Saudi’s recently let slip they do not want to cause such price spikes because it will hasten the developed world’s transition to renewable energy sources.

In Oregon’s case, we have assigned for ourselves the goal of achieving 30,000 EVs sales by 2015, tripling our pro rata share of Obama’s national goal.  This means that 2012 will be a BIG year if we are to stay on track to meet those numbers. According to Charlie Allcock, PGE’s Director of Business Development,  we will be facing formidable challenges including ongoing unemployment, high MSRP, and diminishing tax credit incentives.   If we are to meet just the one percent goal of 10,000 vehicles, we will need to sell 2000 new EVs by the end of 2012.

How do we get there?  The solution lies in a multi-pronged approach. 

We must stress consumer education and outreach.  [Oregon’s Governor’s Transportation Electrification Executive Council  (TEEC) is promoting a strategy of “eyeballs and seats” which presumes that the more vehicles out and about in public, the more people will begin to entertain EVs as an alternative to conventional vehicles.  Providing visibility, driving experience, and broadcasting a positive message using all forms of media (including blogs!) will help inspire change.  The focus group that was videoed live at the conference showed many EV myths remain, including perceptions that the vehicles are prohibitively expensive, have limited range and speed, and take too long to charge.]

We must assist fleet managers in running the numbers to show the long-term operational cost advantages presented by EVs, especially when fuel price volatility is introduced.

We must get people to begin to assess their driving habits, operational costs and routines so their next vehicle purchase  is based on choice of electrified transport that accounts for these realities.

We must start our own social movement by engaging social networks and creating toolkits to promote social engagement with the personal and public virtues of EVs. [Check out Nathan Pinsley, a strategist at Purpose.com, who provided one of the more interesting presentations on bridging the gap from early adopters to mainstream]

We must continue to subsidize technologic innovation to fuel progress in battery development and continued downward trajectory of pricing.

We must build strategic partnerships between electric utilities, smart grid technologies, and regulatory authorities.

We must NOT rely upon Washington to solve our energy problems given the partisan divide and gridlock.  No more federal loan guarantees or manufacturing tax incentives are imminent.   States and regions must provide their own set of solutions.

If we truly aspire to greatness on behalf of our nation and the environment, maybe 30,000  EV sales in Oregon by 2015 isn’t such a daunting number.